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weird, but true

Yesterday, I stopped at my buddy’s house, not realizing that he had a band practice scheduled. With my recent foray back into music, he invited me to stay for practice and jam along with the band.


As you know from my several emails about it, I also play bass in my spare time. And if you have a lick of knowledge on bands, then, well, you probably know that most bands already have a bassist.


Last night was no different.


There’s already a bassist in his band — but he still asked me to join along. After practice ended, he was hyped up about the idea of having two bassists in the band. Something that is as gimmicky as it is groundbreaking. He told me he wanted me to come back for more band practices, so we can see if this idea—playing with two bassists—could actually work.


Now, why am I telling you this?


Believe it or not - there’s a business lesson to unpack.


Y’see, at this unintentional band practice, where every other member has been in said band for years, everyone already had a defined role. The reason no band has ever played with two bassists is because it’s an easy way to muddle the sound. In fact, I know of more bands that play with two drummers (and I mean drummers, not a drummer and someone on percussion) than I know of bands that play with two bassists.


And yet, against all odds, last night somehow worked.


How?


Well, I knew my role.


My role was not a typical role for a bassist. I wasn’t laying down fat grooves, being the connective tissue between the rhythm and melodies, or any of the usual roles a bassist plays. They already had their bassist doing all that.


Instead, I was a textural bassist.


I’d add more texture to the melodies and rhythm. I didn’t try to dominate it. I didn’t try to show the other bassist up. I listened to the music, thought of ways I could conversate with the song, and added cool riffs and ideas to their music.


My only rule?


Don’t take away from what the actual bassist in the band was doing.


There are several business, copywriting, and sales lessons sprinkled throughout this story.


But I ain’t gonna tell them to you because you’re smart enough to figure them out for yourself.


Anywho, need a copywriter who fits into the exact mold your business needs to skyrocket your revenue—not dissimilar to a band with two bassists?



John

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