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Why I *won’t* convince you to partner with me

I was on a sales call recently with someone who had more red flags than a mother of three swiping right on Tinder until her thumbs bleed.


But she had one “green flag” that canceled out her many and many-a red flags.


The “green flag?”


She took action. Immediately. That’s how she snuck into my calendar and booked a call without any back and forth via email.


I would’ve told her to scram if’n we chit-chatted before she booked a call.


But alas, we didn’t. And I’m actively trying to make it harder to book a call with me to prevent this from happening again.


Anywho:


In sales, there are a bunch of red flags to watch out for:


Some people wanna steal your secrets without ponying up. Some people wanna steal your time, so they look “busy” in front of their managers. Some people wanna steal your funnel and process because thinking hurts their brain. And some people are more terrified by success than they are from failure.


I don’t work well with any of these types of clients.


I don’t want them to book a call with me.


And I definitely don’t wanna work with em.


The good news is: These types of people usually expose themselves long before they have an option to book a call.


And I say usually for a reason: Every once in a while a terrible prospect will sneak in.


But, even terrible prospects can make for good emails, which brings me to the point:


During our sales call, she told me I’m not “doing much convincing.”


My response?


You’re right, I’m not. I don’t need your business, and I’m not here to convince you. In fact, if anybody’s convincing anyone of anything, it should be you. My client roster is almost at its brim, which puts the burden on you to convince me to work with you.


My emails have revamped businesses in ways that seem impossible (even to me as I stare at the stats).


For example:


I made a client more revenue from email alone than his entire business made in 2019… from all his marketing channels combined. In our time together, we’ve increased email revenue by some absurd amount—like 3,000% (or more). This liberated him from his mountains of credit card debt. Allowed him to hire more employees. And it funded his many and many-a travels — including a recent trip to see his newborn grandson minutes after he was born.


Another client thought she’d have to shut down during the pandemic. Not only did I help her keep her lights on, but her business thrived throughout the pandemic. Plus, she pivoted her offer, so she can work with clients regardless of her physical location.


I could go on and on with other examples.


But here’s the important part:


Not only do my emails help you make more moolah, but they unlock more freedom for you too.


And, if’n you want more moolah and more freedom, why should I convince you to work with me?


I shouldn’t. You should convince me to work with you.


Because here’s the cold, hard truth:


I don’t *need* your business.


Would I like to have it? Sure. Would I do everything in my power to improve your email funnels, strategy, and copy? Yes. Would I brag about you to my email list if we get amazing results? Absolutely.


But do I need your business?


No, I don’t. So if you expect me to convince you of making, mayhap, the best decision of your entrepreneurial career, unsubscribe right now at the bottom of this email. You have bigger problems than I can help you with.


For everyone else who wants to taste this sweet, sweet freedom and life-changing growth I can help you unlock via email?



Just don’t expect me to convince you. And be ready to convince me on why I should work with you.


Deal?


John

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