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How to maximize conversions when you offer so few products it bores your customers

Today’s the third and final day of the impromptu email mini-series I’m hosting.


Missed the previous emails?


I introduce both problems in the first email. If you missed it, search for the subject line: “The two radically different, but strangely similar ecom problems”


In the second email, I revealed 10 ways to write emails for your brand that has a metric fvckton of products in a way that you don’t confuse your customers and sabotage your sales. And I gave you a couple of warnings I’d avoid if your brand is set up like this. If you missed it, search for the subject line: “How to maximize conversions when you offer so many products it confuses your customers”


Today, I’m revealing how you can handle the problem of having so few products that you risk boring your audience.


Let’s go…


1. Dive deep into the research of your audience’s pain points, failures, successes, hobbies, and more, so you have a new story that positions your product in a new light, each and every day.


2. Focus different emails on different features and benefits of your product. Many products have several features and benefits, and by focusing on different ones, you can come up with new exciting angles with each email you send.


3. Add complementary affiliate products to your overall email strategy, so you’re not rattling on and on about the same product or two each day.


4. Similar to #3, partner with strategic brands, so you can increase your overall lead flow, and introduce your products to a completely new, but similar audience.


5. Create an email mini-series, as I’ve done here, based around a particular and painful problem where you introduce several different angles, use-cases, and stories to give yourself the best chance at persuading a customer to part with their doll-hairs. (This was also a solution in yesterday’s email, but the approach has a twist.)


6. Figure out how to “squeeze” several stories from one story. I did this somewhat recently when I played my first gig in 5+ years.


7. Have a “flagship” product, and make each customer buy this before they buy anything else you offer. (This was also a solution in yesterday’s email, but again, it had a slightly different purpose behind it.)


8. Expand your business in other ways instead of adding new products. Brands with a fewer amount of products are generally tighter and more focused, which means creating something else—whether a service, membership site, etc.—is much easier than if you had a brand with hundreds or thousands of products. Best part here? Well, you can charge a pretty penny for these additional services.


9. Interview your customers, and turn the words they give you into an email, story, and reason to buy. Here’s another perk of having a more tightly-defined niche: It’s easier to interview customers and have them give you the ammo you need to convert more leads into customers.


10. Create more content in general to give yourself a better chance at attracting new leads. This could mean webinars, podcasts, interviews, bonuses, etc. Not only can these attract more people, but it gives you something else to talk about in your emails and use as a reason for your customers to buy.


Of course, as there was in yesterday’s email, I’m barely scratching the surface here.


The point I’m making is this: There are many ways to skin a cat. Whether you have a whole gang of cats outside like—only It’s Always Sunny fans will get this—Charlie and Frank have outside their apartment. Or whether you only have a single cat needing-a skinning.


If you need help creating an email strategy that boosts revenue for your brand that only has a few products, well, then, just hit reply, and let’s chat.


John

Today’s the third and final day of the impromptu email mini-series I’m hosting.


Missed the previous emails?


I introduce both problems in the first email. If you missed it, search for the subject line: “The two radically different, but strangely similar ecom problems”


In the second email, I revealed 10 ways to write emails for your brand that has a metric fvckton of products in a way that you don’t confuse your customers and sabotage your sales. And I gave you a couple of warnings I’d avoid if your brand is set up like this. If you missed it, search for the subject line: “How to maximize conversions when you offer so many products it confuses your customers”


Today, I’m revealing how you can handle the problem of having so few products that you risk boring your audience.


Let’s go…


1. Dive deep into the research of your audience’s pain points, failures, successes, hobbies, and more, so you have a new story that positions your product in a new light, each and every day.


2. Focus different emails on different features and benefits of your product. Many products have several features and benefits, and by focusing on different ones, you can come up with new exciting angles with each email you send.


3. Add complementary affiliate products to your overall email strategy, so you’re not rattling on and on about the same product or two each day.


4. Similar to #3, partner with strategic brands, so you can increase your overall lead flow, and introduce your products to a completely new, but similar audience.


5. Create an email mini-series, as I’ve done here, based around a particular and painful problem where you introduce several different angles, use-cases, and stories to give yourself the best chance at persuading a customer to part with their doll-hairs. (This was also a solution in yesterday’s email, but the approach has a twist.)


6. Figure out how to “squeeze” several stories from one story. I did this somewhat recently when I played my first gig in 5+ years.


7. Have a “flagship” product, and make each customer buy this before they buy anything else you offer. (This was also a solution in yesterday’s email, but again, it had a slightly different purpose behind it.)


8. Expand your business in other ways instead of adding new products. Brands with a fewer amount of products are generally tighter and more focused, which means creating something else—whether a service, membership site, etc.—is much easier than if you had a brand with hundreds or thousands of products. Best part here? Well, you can charge a pretty penny for these additional services.


9. Interview your customers, and turn the words they give you into an email, story, and reason to buy. Here’s another perk of having a more tightly-defined niche: It’s easier to interview customers and have them give you the ammo you need to convert more leads into customers.


10. Create more content in general to give yourself a better chance at attracting new leads. This could mean webinars, podcasts, interviews, bonuses, etc. Not only can these attract more people, but it gives you something else to talk about in your emails and use as a reason for your customers to buy.


Of course, as there was in yesterday’s email, I’m barely scratching the surface here.


The point I’m making is this: There are many ways to skin a cat. Whether you have a whole gang of cats outside like—only It’s Always Sunny fans will get this—Charlie and Frank have outside their apartment. Or whether you only have a single cat needing-a skinning.


If you need help creating an email strategy that boosts revenue for your brand that only has a few products, well, then, just grab a time here, and let’s chat.


John

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