top of page
Search

GetGo commits fatal copy mistake

For those unfamiliar, GetGo is a chain of gas stations, mostly located on the east coast, who also offer “Made-To-Order” food. Fast food in other words. GetGo is a decent fast food option if you’re traveling on the highway. I prefer it over many fast food chains.


Anywho:


I was listening to a sports podcast recently just to wipe off all the extra guru discharge I’ve been covered in since writing about Napoleon Hill’s Think and Grow Rich.


One of the ads on said sports podcast was from GetGo.


And in their ad, they make a fatal copywriting mistake:


Believability.


Here’s why:


The ad claims that GetGo has three expert chefs who fine-tune each meal.


Oh, really?


Fast food joints are now poaching expert chefs?


Maybe guys like Wolfgang Puck, Gordon Ramsey, and the Salt Bae dude have taken their talents to… uh, GetGo?


(I wonder if they pump gas in their spare time too…)


Now, I already stated that I prefer GetGo over many fast food options. But to claim three expert chefs fine-tune every meal is just a flat-out lie.


Which brings me to the point:


Never sacrifice believability for a cool-sounding claim.


You lose trust instantly. And trust is much harder to get back after you lose it.


In fact, there’s a time and place to make your offers sound less amazing in order to boost believability.

For example:


I’ve helped one of my clients boost his email revenue by over 2,000%. I never lead with this because it doesn’t sound believable (even to me, and I can see the data in Google Analytics.)


Sum thought for food.


Anywho:


Need help boosting your bottom line, unlocking more freedom, and building a loyal base of customers with email?



John

1 view0 comments

Recent Posts

See All

3 sneaky ways “optimization” nukes your results

Today’s hustle culture dupes young and hungry biz owners (as well as the old and seasoned ones) into optimization: You must optimize every millisecond of your life otherwise your business will crash o

are high pressure sales calls always a scam?

Last week I booked two appointments with what I thought were lead gen agencies. But calling them lead gen agencies is a bit of a stretch… For one, neither of these companies ran a DFY lead gen agency,

bottom of page