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Do you write copy in “ad voice?”

Sit down and buckle up, cully, because I’m about to learn you up on a powerful, effective, and simple technique which will make every piece of content you create more persuasive and profitable.


And y’know what?


This little tip will help you even if you don’t have a copywriting bone in your body.


Ready?


Good, let’s go:


Do you ever listen to podcasts with sponsors read by the host?


If so, next time I want you to listen to these ads without skipping through them.


Here’s why:


There’s something peculiar almost every host does when it comes time to read the sponsors' message. In fact, I can only think of a few hosts who don’t commit this fatal mistake.


It’s something many newbie copywriters and business owners do when writing copy too. And it applies past just copywriting — it happens anytime you’re trying to persuade people, regardless of the medium.


So what’s this mistake?


They put on an “ad voice.”


Sticking to our podcast example:


Podcast hosts raise their voice an octave or two and sound unnatural when reading the sponsor.


And this does two things:


1. It signals to the listener that they’re being sold to (which is why I’m assuming most listeners can’t skip over ads fast enough).


2. It signals that they don't believe in what they’re promoting.


In fact, one of the telltale signs someone is lying that detectives and lawyers use is when the person in question raises the pitch of their voice.


And guess what:


Many copywriters write in this “ad voice.”


And while it’s not as obvious as the podcast host who’s lying through their teeth for dough for promoting a company they don't believe in, your audience can still sniff this out a mile away.


One of the best solutions is one of the secrets I reveal in my book, which I call:


Pimping your personality.


Your personality is an antidote of sorts to this “ad voice” problem.


For example:


One of the best podcasters who doesn't commit this “ad voice” mistake when reading ad spots is one Pat McAfee.


Here’s why:


He’s a naturally funny and charismatic dude. And he uses these elements of his personality when reading advertising spots for sponsors.


The result?


It sounds more natural and sincere and believable.


Remember:


You must establish trust before anyone buys anything from you.


And this is just one of many ways to do it.


Anywho:


If you need help adding your personality to your copy and emails, so you make more sales, book a call to see if we’re a good fit.


(Please only book a call if you have a proven offer and a list.)


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