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The “Cops and Robbersons” secret for making your clients adore you

Last night, Peanut and I watched “Cops and Robbersons,” a silly little comedy starring Chevy Chase playing Norman Robberson.


The movie begins with Norman returning some movies as detectives sneak up behind him. Turns out, there’s a murderer living next door, and the detectives want to move into Norman’s house for their stake out.


But there’s a deeper problem in the Robberson family:


The family is falling apart. Nobody eats dinner at the same table anymore. The oldest daughter is growing up. The middle son is a teenage, cigarette-smoking rebel. And the youngest son thinks he’s a vampire (and even sleeps in a chest masquerading as his coffin).


This takes a toll on Norman. What he thought was the perfect suburban family has slowly morphed into a nightmare where every person in the family secretly hates one another.


Well, when the two detectives move in, things start to change.


The main detective—Jack Stone—quickly turns into “Uncle Jack,” Norman’s long-lost brother from Boston.


And everyone in the family ADORES Uncle Jack.


They do all the family things Norman has wanted them to do, without asking.


They show up for dinner each night because Uncle Jack’s there.


They surprise Uncle Jack on his birthday with a cake and a present.


Uncle Jack even convinces the youngest son to give up the vampire game, and convinces the middle son to give up smoking.


How was Uncle Jack about the turn this family from a suburban nightmare into the perfect middle-class family?


Simple.


Where Norman was needy, Uncle Jack was not.


In fact, whenever any member of the family did anything nice for Uncle Jack, he just stated how he wanted to be left alone.

When the youngest son vampire bites him, he plays along, and even drives a stake through his heart so the kid would leave him alone.


When the middle son asks him for a cigarette, he tells him that his dad doesn’t want him to smoke because it causes cancer, but he doesn't want him to smoke because he only has one cigarette left.


Uncle Jack’s anti-neediness was infectious to the Robberson family, and as a result, they adored him.


And you know what?


This same thing happens in the wild world of business too.


Customers and clients can “sniff out” neediness miles away. If you haven’t been making as much sales as you’d like, you’re probably being too needy.


Some of the most common (and deadly) signs of neediness include:


* Offering a discount (and a higher discount) every time you send an email


* Only sending emails to your list when you have a promotion going on (your email list isn’t a list of one-night stands, but this is how you treat them when you do this)


* Responding to customer or client questions too quickly


* Being afraid to invest in your business or yourself


And you know what?


If you have employees or contractors who are needy, they can commit a whole slew of needy behaviors that turn your customers off from your brand too.


If this sounds like you, don’t worry. Admission is the first step.


The second step?


Annihilating the neediness before it burns your business to the ground.


One way you can do that is by hitting reply and hopping on a quick call with me.


Not only will I help you see some of these common tells of neediness, but I’ll help you implement an email marketing strategy that doesn’t rely on discounting to make $10k… $20k… and even $100k (or more) through email each and every month like clockwork.


So, book a call, and let’s start there.


John

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